Adam Parris

    Executive Director, Sustainability and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay

    Having lived near estuaries all his life, Adam is passionate about positive change where people, waters, and diverse species converge at the coast and about making science more relevant and useful. Currently, he leads the Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay in New York City, a partnership between governmental, research, and community organizations aimed at improving resilience in the region’s coastal waters. Adam has been awarded a Presidential Green.gov award as Climate Champion, a NOAA Administrator’s Award, and a Bronze medal from the Department of Commerce. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature and Environmental Geology from Bucknell University and a Master of Science in Geology from the University of Vermont. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, two kids and dog, who are a constant source of inspiration, humility, and good humor.

      Martin Schreibman

      Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Brooklyn College

      Martin is Director Emeritus of BC’s Aquatic Research and Environmental Assessment Center (AREAC), a research facility devoted to the study of aquatic organisms — how they grow, adapt, reproduce, and live in all temperatures and environments. He and a multidisciplinary team of researchers seek to answer questions about medicine, nutrition, pollution, aquaculture, fisheries, and marine ecology.  Martin has devoted the past eight years to developing urban aquaponics — growing both fish and plants together in a symbiotic water re-use system.

          Peter Groffman

          Professor, CUNY Advanced Science Research Center and Brooklyn College; Senior Research Fellow, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

          Peter has research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial ecology, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen dynamics. He is chair of the Science Council of the U.S. National Science Foundation-funded Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) network and a participant in LTER projects in Baltimore (urban) and New Hampshire (northern hardwood forests).  Specific recent research efforts from his group include studies of nitrogen dynamics in urban watersheds, lawns, riparian zones and forests, winter climate change effects on nutrient cycling in forests, calcium/nitrogen/carbon interactions in forests, and the effects of exotic earthworm invasion on soil nitrogen and carbon cycling. Peter was a Convening Lead Author for the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment Chapter on Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services and a lead author for the Second (Wetlands) and Third (North America) Assessment Reports of the Intergovernmental Program on Climate Change (IPCC).